Archive for April, 2017

Tahiti History And Culture}

Posted by: pTg2P3NEin Child Education
30
Apr

Submitted by: Rene Thompson

Tahiti is a beautiful island in French Polynesia, located in the southern Pacific Ocean. With a year-round population of 180,000, Tahiti is one of the world’s top vacation destinations. Most residents live along the coastline; the interior of the island is almost completely uninhabited, with many areas accessible only by boat or on foot. The larger, northwestern portion of the island is encircled by a main road that climbs past panoramic views of volcanic mountains, sparkling blue waters, and beautiful sandy beaches. The island’s interior is known for lush rainforests and many streams.

It is believed that Tahiti was settled about 1500 years ago by Polynesians. The mummies of early rulers were laid to rest on Raiatea Mountain, one of two large volcanoes composing the island of Tahiti. As a result, the mountain is considered holy by native Tahitians. The island of Tahiti is dotted with marae, stone structures once used for prayer or sacrifice. Tahiti is home to the fully restored Arahurahu Marae temple, today a popular tourist destination.

The first European contact with the islanders on Tahiti was in 1767. The most famous visitors from these early years include Captain James Cook in 1769, and the crew of HMS Bounty, who mutinied following their departure from Tahiti in 1789. In 1835, Charles Darwin visited Tahiti on an expedition aboard the HMS Beagle. These early visitors immediately noted the relaxed pace of life on Tahiti, a way of life which continues to the present day.

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Like many Polynesian islands, contact with Europeans soon brought diseases, missionaries, and cultural change. Introduced diseases killed a major part of the Tahitian population, leaving a population of just 16,000 by 1797. In 1843, France’s Admiral Dupetit Thouars, acting on his own initiative, annexed the island. War between the French and the Tahitians continued until 1847, and resulted in the island remaining under French control for many years. Today, French Polynesia, a group of islands that includes Tahiti, is officially known as a semi-autonomous ‘French overseas community.’ Tahitians are full French citizens, and France is the official language, although the Tahitian language is also in use.

During World War I, the island was attacked by two German warships, and a French gunboat and German freighter were sunk in the harbor. Between 1966 and 1996, France conducted nearly 200 nuclear bomb tests on and near the island.

Today, native Tahitian culture is very much alive. Tahiti is famous for its traditional dance, the otea. Often confused with the hula of Hawaii because of the grass skirts and hip shaking, it is a slower paced, graceful dance focusing on storytelling with the hands. The dance is built around a theme, and tells stories of daily life or legends of the past.

Tattoos are another significant aspect of Tahitian culture. Men and women young and old have symbolic tattoos over large parts of their body. In Tahiti, tattoos symbolize social status, bravery, community, and beauty.

As in many Polynesian islands, native Tahitians are known for wood carvings, especially tikis. Those wishing to explore tiki culture on Hawaii should visit Moorea’s Tiki Village, where native Polynesians live in thatched huts and preserve traditional tiki art forms.

About the Author: Royal Tiki’s beautiful range of

Tiki

are hand-carved on the Hawaiian island of O’ahu. Also check for current specials on

Tiki bar statues

Source:

isnare.com

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Friday, January 3, 2014

Preston, Victoria, Australia — On Saturday, Wikinews interviewed Tina McKenzie, a former member of the Australia women’s national wheelchair basketball team, known as the Gliders. McKenzie, a silver and bronze Paralympic medalist in wheelchair basketball, retired from the game after the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London. Wikinews caught up with her in a cafe in the leafy Melbourne suburb of Preston.

Tina McKenzie: [The Spitfire Tournament in Canada] was a really good tournament actually. It was a tournament that I wish we’d actually gone back to more often.

((Wikinews)) Who plays in that one?

Tina McKenzie: It’s quite a large Canadian tournament, and so we went as the Gliders team. So we were trying to get as many international games as possible. ‘Cause that’s one of our problems really, to compete. It costs us so much money to for us to travel overseas and to compete internationally. And so we can compete against each other all the time within Australia but we really need to be able to…

((WN)) It’s not the same.

Tina McKenzie: No, it’s really not, so it’s really important to be able to get as a many international trips throughout the year to continue our improvement. Also see where all the other teams are at as well. But yes, Spitfire was good. We took quite a few new girls over there back then in 2005, leading into the World Cup in the Netherlands.

((WN)) Was that the one where you were the captain of the team, in 2005? Or was that a later one?

Tina McKenzie: No, I captained in 2010. So 2009, 2010 World Cup. And then I had a bit of some time off in 2011.

((WN)) The Gliders have never won the World Championship.

Tina McKenzie: We always seem to have just a little bit of a chill out at the World Cup. I don’t know why. It’s really strange occurrence, over the years. 2002 World Cup, we won bronze. Then in 2006 we ended up fourth. It was one of the worst World Cups we’ve played actually. And then in 2010 we just… I don’t know what happened. We just didn’t play as well as we thought we would. Came fourth. But you know what? Fired us up for the actual Paralympics. So the World Cup is… it’s good to be able to do well at the World Cup, to be placed, but it also means that you get a really good opportunity to know where you’re at in that two year gap between the Paralympics. So you can come back home and revisit what you need to do and, you know, where the team’s at. And all that sort of stuff.

((WN)) Unfortunately, they are talking about moving it so it will be on the year before the Paralympics.

Tina McKenzie: Oh really.

((WN)) The competition from the [FIFA] World Cup and all.

Tina McKenzie: Right. Well, that would be sad.

((WN)) But anyway, it is on next year, in June. In Toronto, and they are playing at the Maple Leaf Gardens?

Tina McKenzie: Okay. I don’t know where that is.

((WN)) I don’t know either!

Tina McKenzie: (laughs)

((WN)) We’ll find it. The team in Bangkok was pretty similar. There’s two — yourself and Amanda Carter — who have retired. Katie Hill wasn’t selected, but they had Kathleen O’Kelly-Kennedy back, so there was ten old players and only two new ones.

Tina McKenzie: Which is a good thing for the team. The new ones would have been Georgia [Inglis] and?

((WN)) Caitlin de Wit.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah… Shelley Cronau didn’t get in?

((WN)) No, she’s missed out again.

Tina McKenzie: Interesting.

((WN)) That doesn’t mean that she won’t make the team…

Tina McKenzie: You never know.

((WN)) You never know until they finally announce it.

Tina McKenzie: You never know what happens. Injuries happen leading into… all types of things and so… you never know what the selection is like.

((WN)) They said to me that they expected a couple of people to get sick in Bangkok. And they did.

Tina McKenzie: It’s pretty usual, yeah.

((WN)) They sort of budgeted for three players each from the men’s and women’s teams to be sick.

Tina McKenzie: Oh really? And that worked out?

((WN)) Yeah. I sort of took to counting the Gliders like sheep so I knew “Okay, we’ve only go ten, so who’s missing?”

Tina McKenzie: I heard Shelley got sick.

((WN)) She was sick the whole time. And Caitlin and Georgia were a bit off as well.

Tina McKenzie: It’s tough if you haven’t been to Asian countries as well, competing and…

((WN)) The change of diet affects some people.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah. I remember when we went to Korea and…

((WN)) When was that?

Tina McKenzie: Korea would have been qualifiers in two thousand and… just before China, so that would have been…

((WN)) 2007 or 2008?

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, 2007. Maybe late, no, it might have been early 2007. It was a qualifier for — Beijing, I think actually. Anyway, we went and played China, China and Japan. And it was a really tough tournament on some of our really new girls. They really struggled with the food. They struggled with the environment that we were in. It wasn’t a clean as what they normally exist in. A lot of them were very grumpy. (laughs) It’s really hard when you’re so used to being in such a routine, and you know what you want to eat, and you’re into a tournament and all of a sudden your stomach or your body can’t take the food and you’re just living off rice, and that’s not great for anyone.

((WN)) Yeah, well, the men are going to Seoul for their world championship, while the women go to Toronto. And of course the next Paralympics is in Rio.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I know.

((WN)) It will be a very different climate and very different food.

Tina McKenzie: We all learn to adjust. I have over the years. I’ve been a vegetarian for the last thirteen years. Twelve years maybe. So you learn to actually take food with you. And you learn to adjust, knowing what environment you’re going in to, and what works for you. I have often carried around cans of red kidney beans. I know that I can put that in lettuce or in salad and get through with a bit of protein. And you know Sarah Stewart does a terrific job being a vegan, and managing the different areas and countries that we’ve been in to. Germany, for example, is highly dependent on the meat side of food, and I’m pretty sure I remember in Germany I lived on pasta and spaghetti. Tomato sauce. Yeah, that was it. (laughs) That’s alright. You just learn. I think its really hard for the new girls that come in to the team. It’s so overwhelming at the best of times anyway, and their nerves are really quite wracked I’d say, and that different travel environment is really hard. So I think the more experience they can get in traveling and playing internationally, the better off they’ll be for Rio.

((WN)) One of the things that struck me about the Australian team — I hadn’t seen the Gliders before London. It was an amazing experience seeing you guys come out on the court for the first time at the Marshmallow…

Tina McKenzie: (laughs)

((WN)) It was probably all old hat to you guys. You’d been practicing for months. Certainly since Sydney in July.

Tina McKenzie: It was pretty amazing, yeah. I think it doesn’t really matter how many Paralympics you actually do, being able to come out on that court, wherever it is, it’s never dull. It’s always an amazing experience, and you feel quite honored, and really proud to be there and it still gives you a tingle in your stomach. It’s not like “oh, off I go. Bored of this.”

((WN)) Especially that last night there at the North Greenwich Arena. There were thirteen thousand people there. They opened up some extra parts of the stadium. I could not even see the top rows. They were in darkness.

Tina McKenzie: It’s an amazing sport to come and watch, and its an amazing sport to play. It’s a good spectator sport I think. People should come and see especially the girls playing. It’s quite tough. And I was talking to someone yesterday and it was like “Oh I don’t know how you play that! You know, it’s so rough. You must get so hurt.” It’s great! Excellent, you know? Brilliant game that teaches you lots of strategies. And you can actually take all those strategies off the court and into your life as well. So it teaches you a lot of discipline, a lot of structure and… it’s a big thing. It’s not just about being on the court and throwing a ball around.

((WN)) When I saw you last you were in Sydney and you said you were moving down to Melbourne. Why was that?

Tina McKenzie: To move to Melbourne? My mum’s down here. And I lived here for sixteen years or something.

((WN)) I know you lived here for a long time, but you moved up to Sydney. Did your teacher’s degree up there.

Tina McKenzie: I moved to Sydney to go to uni, and Macquarie University were amazing in the support that they actually gave me. Being able to study and play basketball internationally, the scholarship really helped me out. And you know, it wasn’t just about the scholarship. It was.. Deidre Anderson was incredible. She’s actually from Melbourne as well, but her support emotionally and “How are you doing?” when she’d run into you and was always very good at reading people… where they’re at. She totally understands at the levels of playing at national level and international level and so it wasn’t just about Macquarie supporting me financially, it was about them supporting me the whole way through. And that was how I got through my degree, and was able to play at that level for such a long time.

((WN)) And you like teaching?

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I do. Yeah, I do. I’m still waiting on my transfer at the moment from New South Wales to Victoria, but teaching’s good. It’s really nice to be able to spend some time with kids and I think its really important for kids to be actually around people with disabilities to actually normalize us a little bit and not be so profound about meeting someone that looks a little bit different. And if I can do that at a young age in primary school and let them see that life’s pretty normal for me, then I think that’s a really important lesson.

((WN)) You retired just after the Paralympics.

Tina McKenzie: I did. Yeah. Actually, it took me quite a long time to decide to do that. I actually traveled after London. So I backpacked around… I went to the USA and then to Europe. And I spent a lot of time traveling and seeing amazing new things, and spending time by myself, and reflecting on… So yes, I got to spend quite a bit of time reflecting on my career and where I wanted to go.

((WN)) Your basketball career or your teaching career?

Tina McKenzie: All the above. Yeah. Everything realistically. And I think it was a really important time for me to sort of decide sort of where I wanted to go in myself. I’d spent sixteen years with the Gliders. So that’s a long time to be around the Gliders apparently.

((WN)) When did you join them for the first time?

Tina McKenzie: I think it was ’89? No, no, no, sorry, no, no, no, ’98. We’ll say 1998. Yeah, 1998 was my first tournament, against USA. So we played USA up in New South Wales in the Energy Australia tour. So we traveled the coast. Played up at Terrigal. It was a pretty amazing experience, being my first time playing for Australia and it was just a friendly competition so… Long time ago. And that was leading into 2000, into the big Sydney Olympics. That was the beginning of an amazing journey realistically. But going back to why I retired, or thinking about retiring, I think when I came home I decided to spend a little bit more time with mum. Cause we’d actually lost my dad. He passed away two years ago. He got really sick after I came back from World Cup, in 2011, late 2010, he was really unwell, so I spent a lot of time down here. I actually had a couple of months off from the Gliders because I needed to deal with the family. And I think that it was really good to be able to get back and get on the team and… I love playing basketball but after being away, and I’ve done three Paralympics, I’ve been up for four campaigns, I think its time now to actually take a step backwards and… Well not backwards… take a step out of it and spend quality time with mum and quality time with people that have supported me throughout the years of me not being around home but floating back in and floating out again and its a really… it’s a nice time for me to be able to also take on my teaching career and trying to teach and train and work full time is really hard work and I think its also time for quite a few of the new girls to actually step up and we’ve got quite a few… You’ve got Caitlin, and you’ve got Katie and you’ve got Shelley and Georgia. There’s quite a few nice girls coming through that will fit really well into the team and it’s a great opportunity for me to go. It’s my time now. See where they go with that, and retire from the Gliders. It was a hard decision. Not an easy decision to retire. I definitely miss it. But I think now I’d rather focus on maybe helping out at the foundation level of starting recruitment and building up a recruiting side in Melbourne and getting new girls to come along and play basketball. People with… doesn’t even have to be girls but just trying to re-feed our foundation level of basketball, and if I can do that now I think that’s still giving towards the Gliders and Rollers eventually. That would be really nice. Just about re-focusing. I don’t want to completely leave basketball. I’d still like to be part of it. Looking to the development side of things and maybe have a little bit more input in that area would be really nice though. Give back the skills I’ve been taught over the years and be a bit of an educator in that area I think would be nice. It’s really hard when you’re at that international level to… you’re so time poor that it’s really hard to be able to focus on all that recruitment and be able to give out skill days when you’re actually trying to focus on improving yourself. So now I’ve got that time that I could actually do that. Be a little bit more involved in mentoring maybe, something like that. Yeah, that’s what I’d like to do.

((WN)) That would be good.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah! That would be great, actually. So I’ve just been put on the board of Disability Sport and Recreation, which is the old Wheelchair Sports Victoria. So that’s been a nice beginning move. Seeing where all the sports are at, and what we’re actually facilitating in Victoria, considering I’ve been away from Victoria for so long. It’s nice to know where they’re all at.

((WN)) Where are they all at?

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, dunno. They’re not very far at all. Victoria… I think Victoria is really struggling in the basketball world. Yeah, I think there’s a bit of a struggle. Back in the day… back in those old times, where Victoria would be running local comps. We’d have an A grade and a B grade on a Thursday night, and we’d have twelve teams in A grade and B grade playing wheelchair basketball. That’s a huge amount of people playing and when you started in B grade you’d be hoping that you came around and someone from A grade would ask you to come and play. So it was a really nice way to build your basketball skills up and get to know that community. And I think its really important to have a community, people that you actually feel comfortable and safe around. I don’t want to say it’s a community of disabled people. It’s actually…

((WN)) It’s not really because…

Tina McKenzie: Well, it’s not. The community’s massive. It’s not just someone being in a chair. You’ve got your referees, you’ve got people that are coming along to support you. And it’s a beautiful community. I always remember Liesl calling it a family, and it’s like a family so… and it’s not just Australia-based. It’s international. It’s quite incredible. It’s really lovely. But it’s about providing that community for new players to come through. And you know, not every player that comes through to play basketball wants to be a Paralympian. So its about actually providing sport, opportunities for people to be physically active. And if they do want to compete for Australia and they’re good enough, well then we support that. But I think it’s really hard in the female side of things. There’s not as many females with a disability.

((WN)) Yeah, they kept on pointing that out…

Tina McKenzie: It’s really hard, but I think one of the other things is that we also need to be able to get the sport out there into the general community. And it’s not just about having a disability, it’s about coming along and playing with your mate that might be classifiable or an ex-basketball player. Like I was talking to a friend of mine the other day and she’s six foot two…

((WN)) Sounds like a basketball player already.

Tina McKenzie: She’s been a basketball player, an AB basketball player for years. Grew up playing over in Adelaide, and her knee is so bad that she can’t run anymore, and she can’t cycle, but yet wants to be physically active, and I’m like “Oooh, you can come along and play wheelchair basketball” and she’s like “I didn’t even think that I could do that!” So it’s about promoting. It not that you actually have to be full time in the chair, or being someone with an amputation or other congenitals like a spinal disability, it’s wear and tear on people’s bodies and such.

((WN)) Something I noticed in the crowd in London. People seemed to think that they were in the chair all the time and were surprised when most of the Rollers got up out of their chairs at the end of the game.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah.

((WN)) Disability is a very complicated thing.

Tina McKenzie: It is, yeah.

((WN)) I was surprised myself at people who were always in a chair, but yet can wiggle their toes.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, it’s the preconceived thing, like if you see someone in a chair, a lot of people just think that nothing works, but in hindsight there are so many varying levels of disability. Some people don’t need to be in a chair all the time, sometimes they need to be in it occasionally. Yeah, it’s kind of a hard thing.

((WN)) Also talking to the classifiers and they mentioned the people playing [wheelchair] basketball who have no disability at all but are important to the different teams, that carry their bags and stuff.

Tina McKenzie: So important, yeah. It’s the support network and I think that when we started developing Women’s National League to start in 2000, one of the models that we took that off was the Canadian Women’s National League. They run an amazing national league with huge amounts of able bodied women coming in and playing it, and they travel all over Canada [playing] against each other and they do have a round robin in certain areas like our Women’s National League as well but it’s so popular over there that it’s hard to get on the team. They have a certain amount of women with disabilities and then other able bodied women that just want to come along and play because they see it as a really great sport. And that’s how we tried to model our Women’s National League off. It’s about getting many women just to play sport, realistically.

((WN)) Getting women to play sport, whether disabled or not, is another story. And there seems to be a reluctance amongst women to participate in sports, particularly sports that they regard as being men’s sports.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, a masculine sport.

((WN)) They would much rather play a sport that is a women’s sport.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, it’s really hard. I think it’s about just encouraging people, communicating, having a really nice welcoming, come and try day. We run a… like Sarah [Stewart] actually this yeah will be running the women’s festival of sport, which is on the 30th of January. And that’s an amazing tournament. That actually started from club championship days, where we used to run club championships. And then the club championships then used to feed in to our Women’s National League. Club championships used to about getting as many women to come along and play whether they’re AB or have a disability. It’s just about participation. It’ll be a really fun weekend. And it’s a pretty easy weekend for some of us.

((WN)) Where is it?

Tina McKenzie: Next year, in 2014, it’ll be January the 30th at Narrabeen. We hold it every year. And last year we got the goalball girls to come along and play. So we had half of the goalball girls come and play for the weekend and they had an absolute brilliant time. Finding young girls that are walking down the street that just want to come and play sport. Or they have a friend at high school that has a disability. And it’s just about having a nice weekend, meeting other people that have disabilities or not have disabilities and just playing together. It’s a brilliant weekend. And every year we always have new faces come along and we hope that those new faces stay around and enjoy the weekend. Because it’s no so highly competitive, it’s just about just playing. Like last year I brought three or four friends of mine, flew up from Melbourne, ABs, just to come along and play. It was really nice that I had the opportunity to play a game of basketball with the friends that I hang out with. Which was really nice. So the sport’s not just Paralympics.

((WN)) How does Victoria compare with New South Wales?

Tina McKenzie: Oh, that’s a thing to ask! (laughs) Look I think both states go in highs and lows, in different things. I think all the policies that have been changing in who’s supporting who and… like, Wheelchair Sports New South Wales do a good job at supporting the basketball community. Of course, there’s always a willingness for more money to come in but they run a fairly good support and so does the New South Wales Institute of Sport. It’s definitely gotten better since I first started up there. And then, it’s really hard to compare because both states do things very differently. Yeah, really differently and I always remember being in Victoria… I dunno when that was… in early 2000. New South Wales had an amazing program. It seemed so much more supportive than what we had down here in Victoria. But then even going to New South Wales and seeing the program that they have up there, it wasn’t as brilliant as… the grass isn’t always greener on the other side, cause there there good things and there were weren’t so great things about the both programs in Victoria and in New South Wales so… The VIS [Victorian Institute of Sport] do some great support with some of the athletes down here, and NSWIS [New South Wales Instituted of Sport] are building and improving and I know their program’s changed quite a lot now with Tom [Kyle] and Ben [Osborne] being involved with NSWIS so I can’t really give feedback on how that program’s running but in short I know that when NSWIS employed Ben Osborne to come along and actually coach us as a basketball individual and as in group sessions it was the best thing that they ever did. Like, it was so good to be able to have one coach to actually go and go we do an individual session or when are you running group sessions and it just helped me. It helped you train. It was just a really… it was beneficial. Whereas Victoria don’t have that at the moment. So both states struggle some days. I mean, back in 2000 Victoria had six or seven Gliders players, and then New South Wales had as many, and then it kind of does a big swap. It depends on what the state infrastructure is, what the support network is, and how local comps are running, how the national league’s running, and it’s about numbers. It’s all about numbers.

((WN)) At the moment you’ll notice a large contingent of Gliders from Western Australia.

Tina McKenzie: Yes, yes, I have seen that, yeah. And that’s good because its… what happens is, someone comes along in either state, or wherever it may be, and they’re hugely passionate about building and improving that side of things and they have the time to give to it, and that’s what’s happened in WA [Western Australia]. Which has been great. Ben Ettridge has been amazing, and so has John. And then in New South Wales you have Gerry driving that years ago. Gerry has always been a hugely passionate man about improving numbers, about participation, and individuals’ improvement, you know? So he’s been quite a passionate man about making sure people are improving individually. And you know, Gerry Hewson’s been quite a driver of wheelchair basketball in New South Wales. He’s been an important factor, I think.

((WN)) The news recently has been Basketball Australia taking over the running of things. The Gliders now have a full time coach.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, which is fantastic! That’s exciting. It’s a good professional move, you know? It’s nice to actually know that that’s what’s happening and I think that only will lead to improvement of all the girls, and the Gliders may go from one level up to the next level which is fantastic so… and Tom sounds like a great man so I really hope that he enjoys himself.

((WN)) I’m sure he is.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I’ve done some work with Tom. He’s a good guy.

((WN)) Did you do some work with him?

Tina McKenzie: Ah, well, no, I just went up to Brisbane a couple of times and did some development days. Played in one of their Australia Day tournaments with some of the developing girls that they have. We did a day camp leading into that. Went and did a bit of mentoring I guess. And it was nice to do that with Tom. That was a long time before Tom… I guess Tom had just started on the men’s team back them. He was very passionate about improving everyone, which he still is.

((WN)) Watching the Gliders and the Rollers… with the Rollers, they can do it. With the Gliders… much more drama from the Gliders in London. For a time we didn’t even know if they were going to make the finals. Lost that game against Canada.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, that wasn’t a great game. No. It was pretty scary. But, you know, we always fight back. In true Gliders style. Seems to be… we don’t like to take the easy road, we like to take the hard road, sometimes.

((WN)) Apparently.

Tina McKenzie: It’s been a well-known thing. I don’t know why it is but it just seems to happen that way.

((WN)) You said you played over 100 [international] games. By our count there was 176 before you went to London, plus two games there makes 178 international caps. Which is more than some teams that you played against put together.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I thought I’d be up to nearly 200. Look, I think it’s an amazing thing to have that many games under your belt and the experience that’s gained me throughout the years, and you’ve got to be proud about it. Proud that I stayed in there and competed with one of the best teams in the world. I always believed that the Gliders can be the best in the world but…

((WN)) You need to prove it.

Tina McKenzie: Need to get there. Just a bit extra.

((WN)) Before every game in London there was an announcement that at the World Championships and the Paralympics “they have never won”.

Tina McKenzie: No, no. I remember 2000 in Sydney, watching the girls play against Canada in 2000. Terrible game. Yet they were a brilliant team in 2000 as well. I think the Gliders have always had a great team. Just unfortunately, that last final game. We haven’t been able to get over that line yet.

((WN)) You were in the final game in 2004.

Tina McKenzie: Yep, never forget that. It was an amazing game.

((WN)) What was it like?

Tina McKenzie: I think we played our gold medal game against the USA the first game up. We knew that we had to beat USA that day, that morning. It was 8am in the morning, maybe 8:30 in the morning and it was one of the earliest games that we played and we’d been preparing for this game knowing that we had to beat USA to make sure that our crossovers would be okay, and knew that we’d sit in a really good position against the rest of the teams that we would most likely play. And I think that being my first ever Paralympic Games it was unforgettable. I think I’ll never, not forget it. The anticipation, adrenalin and excitement. And also being a little bit scared sometimes. It was really an amazing game. We did play really, really well. We beat America by maybe one point I think that day. So we played a tough, tough game. Then we went into the gold medal game… I just don’t think we had much left in our energy fuel. I think it was sort of… we knew that we had to get there but we just didn’t have enough to get over the line, and that was really unfortunate. And it was really sad. It was sad that we knew that we could actually beat America, but at the end of the day the best team wins.

((WN)) The best team on the court on the day.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, absolutely. And that can change any day. It depends where your team’s at. What the ethos is like. and so it’s… Yeah, I don’t think you can actually say that every team’s gonna be on top every day, and it’s not always going to be that way. I’m hoping the Gliders will put it all together and be able to take that way through and get that little gold medal. That would be really nice. Love to see that happen.

((WN)) I’d like to see that happen. I’d really like to see them win. In Toronto, apparently, because the Canadian men are not in the thing, the Canadians are going to be focusing on their women’s team. They apparently didn’t take their best team and their men were knocked out by Columbia or Mexico or something like that.

Tina McKenzie: Wow.

((WN)) And in the women’s competition there’s teams like Peru. But I remember in London that Gliders were wrong-footed by Brazil, a team that they had never faced before. Nearly lost that game.

Tina McKenzie: (laughs) Oh yes. Brazil were an unknown factor to us. So they were quite unknown. We’d done a bit of scouting but if you’ve never played someone before you get into an unknown situation. We knew that they’d be quite similar players to Mexico but you know what? Brazil had a great game. They had a brilliant game. We didn’t have a very good game at all. And it’s really hard going into a game that you know that you need to win unbeknown to what all these players can do. You can scout them as much as you want but it’s actually about being on court and playing them. That makes a huge difference. I think one of the things here in Australia is that we play each other so often. We play against each other so often in the Women’s National League. We know exactly what… I know that Shelley Chaplin is going to want to go right and close it up and Cobi Crispin is going to dive underneath the key and do a spin and get the ball. So you’ve actually… you know what these players want to do. I know that Kylie Gauci likes to double screen somewhere, and she’ll put it in, and its great to have that knowledge of what your players really like to do when you’re playing with them but going into a team like Brazil we knew a couple of the players, what they like to do but we had no idea what their speed was like or what their one-pointers were going to do. Who knows? So it was a bit of an unknown.

((WN)) They’ll definitely be an interesting side when it comes to Rio.

Tina McKenzie: I think they’ll be quite good. And that happened with China. I’ll always remember seeing China when we were in Korea for the first time and going “Wow, these girls can hardly move a chair” but some of them could shoot, and they went from being very fresh players to going into China as quite a substantial team, and then yet again step it up again in London. And they’re a good team. I think its really important as not to underestimate any team at a Paralympics or at a World Cup. I mean, Netherlands have done that to us over and over again.

((WN)) They’re a tough team too.

Tina McKenzie: They’re a really tough team and they’re really unpredictable sometimes. Sometimes when they’re on, they’re on. They’re tough. They’re really tough. And they’ve got a little bit of hunger in them now. Like, they’re really hungry to be the top team. And you can see that. And I remember seeing that in Germany, in Beijing.

((WN)) The Germans lost to the Americans in the final in Beijing.

Tina McKenzie: Yes. Yeah, they did.

((WN)) And between 2008 and 2012 all they talked about was the US, and a rematch against the US. But of course when it came to London, they didn’t face the US at all, because you guys knocked the US out of the competition.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, we did. It was great. A great game that.

((WN)) You won by a point.

Tina McKenzie: Fantastic. Oh my God I came. Still gives me heart palpitations.

((WN)) It went down to a final shot. There was a chance that the Americans would win the thing with a shot after the siren. Well, a buzzer-beater.

Tina McKenzie: Tough game. Tough game. That’s why you go to the Paralympics. You have those tough, nail-biting games. You hope that at the end of the day that… Well, you always go in as a player knowing that you’ve done whatever you can do.

((WN)) Thankyou very much for this.

Tina McKenzie: That’s alright. No problems at all!

Tuesday, October 2, 2007

Vicki Gunn is running for the Family Coalition Party in the Ontario provincial election, in the Glengarry-Prescott-Russell riding. Wikinews’ Nick Moreau interviewed her regarding her values, her experience, and her campaign.

Stay tuned for further interviews; every candidate from every party is eligible, and will be contacted. Expect interviews from Liberals, Progressive Conservatives, New Democratic Party members, Ontario Greens, as well as members from the Family Coalition, Freedom, Communist, Libertarian, and Confederation of Regions parties, as well as independents.

Steel Casting}

Posted by: pTg2P3NEin Balustrades
20
Apr

steel casting

by

Amit Jain

Casting is a manufacturing process in which molten metal is poured into a

mold, allowed to solidify within the mold, and then the mold is broken and

the solid piece is taken out. Casting is used for making parts of complex

shape that would be difficult or uneconomical to make by other methods. High

alloy Steel castings can be heat treated to bring about the diffusion of

carbon or alloying elements, softening, hardening, stress relieving,

toughening, improve machinability, increase wear resistance, and removal of

hydrogen entrapped at the surface of the casting.

Ferrous Castings in practically all grades as per national and international

standards are manufactured, supplied to various Industries in India and

exported to Countries in Europe, Australia, Africa, Russia, Asia

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==The Casting product range includes== Plain Carbon Steel Castings

High Alloy Steel Castings

Manganese Steel Castings

Hi Chrome Castings

Ni-Hard Castings

SG Iron Castings

Stainless Steel Castings

Heat Resistant Cast Steel

==Kesri Steels Provide Casting for following Major user industries== Castings

for Steel Plants

Castings for Sugar Mills

Castings for Heavy Engineering Industries

Castings for Cement Plants

Castings for Chemical Industries

Castings for Valve Industries

Casting for Earth Moving Equipments

Casting for Thermal & Hydro Power Generation Plants

Castings for Mining Industries

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Castings for Crushing Plants

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CUSTOMERS.

Kesri Steels Limited

A – 350, Phase – I, Riico Industrial Area,

Bhiwadi – 301019

RAJASTHAN

INDIA

http://www.kesristeels.com

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Email: info@kesristeels.com | Phone:+91 1493 220142 | Fax:+91 1493 220562 |

Mobile:+91 9312377177

http://www.kesristeels.com

http://www.steelcasting.co.in

Article Source:

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}

Chilean earthquakes: in pictures

Posted by: pTg2P3NEin Uncategorized
20
Apr

Thursday, March 18, 2010

On the Feb. 27, Chile was hit by an magnitude 8.8 earthquake; almost 500 were killed, with resulting tsunami destroying most coastal towns between Llolleo and Araucanía Region. A second earthquake last week, with its epicentre in Pichilemu, caused destruction in the Coquimbo and Bío Bío regions.

A Wikinews contributor is in the area, and we look at the extent of this natural disaster’s damage through his photographs.


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People camping in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu. They even constructed little houses, to make their stay more comfortable.Image: Diego Grez.

Church of Santa Cruz, after the February earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

The Arturo Prat square before and after the earthquake and tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Boat after tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Military representatives in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu, after the March earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

On-scene soldiers on a truck, in Lolol, after the March earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed balaustrades and the ceiling of a kiosk over another balaustrades, near the beach of Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Lolol church after the March earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses in Lolol were declared Historic Monuments of Chile. This is one of many that are going to be demolished.Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed building Mirador by the tsunami in Pichilemu, and also by a kiosk/container.Image: Diego Grez.

Cars driving to La Cruz Hill in Pichilemu, a few hours after the disaster.Image: Diego Grez.

Chilean singer Joe Vasconcellos did a free solo tour in Chile after the Pichilemu and Maule earthquakes. Pictured during his performance in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

House in front of the Main Beach of Pichilemu after the tsunami and earthquake combo.Image: Diego Grez.

Bucalemu was severely impacted by the February tsunami and earthquake; this picture taken after the March temblor.Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses were destroyed after the earthquake in Lolol, because they were old and made with rustic materials.Image: Diego Grez.

Another destroyed house, a few meters behind the Lolol church.Image: Diego Grez.

Pichilemu highway, the day of the earthquake and tsunami.Image: Diego Grez.

Most of the balustrades aroundRoss Park, in Pichilemu, were destroyed after the 2010 Pichilemu earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed kiosks after the tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Just one kiosk and some bathrooms in front of the Arturo Prat Square survived the tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

The Cahuil Bridge was severely damaged after both quakes. It is broken in half and is a serious danger to motorists.Image: Diego Grez.

Several houses were destroyed in the town of Bucalemu, almost 40 kilometers from Pichilemu. In this picture, a house located in front of the beach was later thrown in the half of the roadway.Image: Diego Grez.

Cobquecura, the epicentre of the February quake.

The building Alto Río, in Concepción, collapsed after the February earthquake.Image: Claudio Núñez.

A severely damaged building in Maipú.Image: Jorge Barrios.

Collapsed Vespucio Norte Express Highway in Santiago, after the February earthquake.

The damaged Museum of Contemporary Art, after the February earthquake.

Aftermath of the February earthquake and tsunami in San Antonio.Image: Atilio Leandro.

Damaged Autopista del Maipo, near the city of Chada.Image: Lufke.

People trying to buy gasoline, in Chillán.Image: JOjo Jose Tomas.

Fire in the University of Concepción, after the February earthquake.

Destroyed houses in the Maule Region.Image: Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Fire in a plastics factory, in Ruta 5 Norte.

Chillán‘s Medialuna after the February earthquake.

House in Pelluhue after the February temblor.Image: Caritas Linares.

US President Barack Obama holds a conference call from the White House Situation Room.

President Sebastián Piñera visits ONEMI after the February quake.Image: Sebastián Piñera E..

Zones affected by the February earthquake.Image: B1mbo.

Map of Chile showing the epicenter of the February quake.

USGS shake map of the February earthquake.

USGS intensity map of the March earthquake.

USGS intensity map for the most strong aftershock of the temblor.Image: USGS.

This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.

Pichilemu and Cobquecura, Chile rocked again by aftershocks

Posted by: pTg2P3NEin Uncategorized
20
Apr

Friday, March 26, 2010

Two medium intensity seisms were registered in Chile. These quakes are aftershocks of the March 11 Pichilemu earthquake. According to the University of Chile Geological Survey, the first one took place at 9:59 local time (13:59 UTC); its epicenter was located 17 kilometers northeast of Pichilemu, with a magnitude of 4.7. It lasted about ten seconds. The second aftershock had a magnitude of 5.1, and occurred at the 10:57 local time (14:57 UTC), with its epicenter located 15 kilometers north of Cobquecura.

The National Emergencies Office graded the scale of the seisms on the Mercalli scale, which attempts to quantify the amount of physical damage caused by an earthquake. The intensities of the smaller aftershock were determined to be V in Pichilemu, III in Talca and II in San Fernando, while the larger 5.1 magnitude earthquake only hit IV in Pichilemu, but registered a IV in Talca as well, due to its closer proximity to that city.

Thursday morning the Municipality of Pichilemu posted a letter via Facebook to all those affected by the February 27 and March 11 earthquakes in the surrounding areas of Pichilemu, like Ciruelos, Alto Ramírez, and others. However, they didn’t name the village of Espinillo. The mayor of Pichilemu, Roberto Córdova, was criticized for not giving aid to the village. Córdova responded that he was “doing his best to aid [the surrounding areas]. [The Municipality] is going to replace the [balustrades] destroyed by the 11 March earthquake,” and “these places are receiving the aid they require.”

Submitted by: Alex Kecskes

While we love to feed birds and watch them fly, pest birds can be a real pain. They eat our stored foods, peck at our orchards and vineyards and destroy our buildings and statues. They make it unsafe for restaurants to serve food outside, and they contaminate our parks and playgrounds with disease carrying droppings. Pest birds have even been known to bring down our jet aircraft. It’s no wonder someone invented the Bird Proof Spike.

Surprisingly effective and easy to install, the bird control spikes have been enthusiastically received by businesses and municipalities throughout the world. No longer do property owners have to deal with the myriad problems caused by pest birds. Gone are the unsanitary bird droppings and nests that used to clog gutters, downpour spouts and AC units. No longer need boat owners worry about pest bird droppings eating into sails, sheets and canvas covers, or seizing up radar antennas. Even slip-and-fall hazards on decks and runners are things of the past, thanks to bird proof spikes.

The simple bird proof spike has been hugely successful in preventing birds from landing and roosting on ledges, parapets, cutouts, signs, beams, chimneys, security cameras, lights, and countless other areas. The blunted spikes look threatening but are actually quite innocuous to birds and people.

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So what makes the bird proof spike so effective? Simple. Pest birds just can’t seem to twist their wings or “landing gear” anywhere near the spikes. Because of its widespread popularity, the bird proof spike now comes in various types and sizes. For example, there’s the long-lasting flexible stainless steel spike, the rigid U.V.-resistant unbreakable polycarbonate spike, and many application-specific spikes in various sizes.

Another advantage of the bird proof spike is that it has won the approval of almost every humane group around the globe–including the U.S. Humane Society and PICAS. Architects and building contractors like the spike as well, since it combines aesthetics with function.

Those ready to purchase and install bird proof spikes will find the following basic specs handy. First off, spikes come in a wide range of types, sizes and colors. Many manufacturers offer spike strips in 3-, 5- and 7-inch widths. Stainless steel spike strips typically come in 1″,3″, 5″ and 8″ widths. The strips typically come in two-foot sections and can be quickly installed using glue, nails or screws, depending on the surface they will rest on. Look for bird proof spikes that have a flexible base, spikes that let you easily bend them to fit onto curved surfaces. Spikes that have a flexible base will fit on rounded signs and signal lights, ledges and wandering parapets. You can also get crush proof spikes with a non-reflective metal finish.

If you have a problem with pigeons and larger pest birds crowding on girders or I-beams, go with Stainless Steel Girder Spikes. These usually come in standard two-foot sections and 3,5, and 8 widths. The spikes use adjustable C clamps along the base, which makes them easier to install. For big birds like seagulls, cormorants, turkey vultures, and raptors, you would probably be better off with the Mega Spike. These bird proof spike strips typically sport extended 7 high spikes made of marine-grade stainless steel.

To keep pest birds from clogging exterior drains and gutters, many property owners have sought relief using the Gutter Spike. These bird proof spikes are ideal for use against seagulls, crows, and pigeons. You can order these spikes in two-foot long strips for easy installation. The gutter spikes come with adjustable clamps at the base. This makes them easy to attach to the lip of a gutter. Which brings us to some important installation guidelines.

Installing bird proof spikes correctly calls for some initial prep work. First off, you’ll have to clear out all nesting materials and excess bird droppings. If your installation calls for the spikes to be glued down, apply the glue generously onto the base of the spike (about 1/2-inch thick), then press the base of the spike level with the surface’s edge. Don’t leave any gaps between spikes (no more than two inches). When installing spikes on a wide ledge, use at least three or more rows of spikes. Be sure to close any gaps between the rows (no gaps more than two inches). Closing holes or gaps between spikes is key here, for pest birds are smart critters. When installing gutter spikes, take advantage of the clips that attach to the bottom of the spike. Remember, pest birds are fairly agile and can manage to land on the very smallest of spots.

About the Author: Alex Kecskes is a freelance writer focusing on effective bird control. To learn more about the Bird Spikes mentioned in this article, visit Absolute Bird Control

absolutebirdcontrol.com

.

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Murray Hill on the life and versatility of a New York drag king

Posted by: pTg2P3NEin Uncategorized
18
Apr

Monday, November 19, 2007

Drag—dressing in the clothing atypical of your born gender—in recent years has found mainstream success. Films such as Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil and To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar have prominently featured drag performers. But they have all focused on men in drag as women.

Murray Hill is a comedian, emcee and performer. He is also a drag king. Called “The Hardest Working Middle-aged Man in Show Business”, The New York Times christened him “the current reigning patriarch of the downtown performance community.” He is seemingly everywhere, emceeing a bingo night at the now closed, Jimmy Fallon-backed Mo Pitkins’ House of Satisfaction on Avenue A, or hosting the Polyamorous Pride Day in Central Park. Hill has become a legend in New York’s “anything goes” counterculture theater scene who is beginning to find mainstream success; which would be a first for a drag king.

David Shankbone’s examination of New York City‘s culture has brought him to the whip’s end of a BDSM dungeon, on the phone with RuPaul, matching wits with Michael Musto, grilling Gay Talese, eating dinner with Augusten Burroughs and quizzing the bands that play the Bowery Ballroom. In this segment he talks to downtown legend Murray Hill, former New York City mayoral candidate and comedian, on the last night of Mo Pitkins’ House of Satisfaction.

Contents

  • 1 Murray Hill the performer
  • 2 Murray Hill the person
  • 3 Drag as performance art for women
  • 4 The gay community and drag artists
  • 5 Drag queens and drag kings: the differences
  • 6 The direction of New York downtown culture
  • 7 Sources

China launches major cleanup operation after oil spill

Posted by: pTg2P3NEin Uncategorized
18
Apr

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

After an oil pipeline in China exploded and spilled around 1,500 tonnes of oil into the Yellow Sea near the city of Dalian, the government has launched a cleanup operation consisting of more than 800 vessels.

The spill occurred on Friday, after a pipeline at the port exploded. The oil terminal at the port has been closed ever since. Authorities have been using 24 ships designed for cleaning up oil, and today ordered around 800 civilian fishing boats to join the operation.

The spill has been halted, although an oil slick which measured 50 square kilometers at its height remains in the harbor, and ships are using absorbent foam to remove oil from the water, as well as barriers to keep oil from reaching the shore. Despite their efforts, parts of the coast reportedly have a slick of oil evident on beaches and rocks.

Although rough seas have affected the cleanup, authorities expect to have completed the operations within ten days.

According to domestic media, concerns over safety at the port have been raised in the past; a government study in 2006 noted that five projects at the port were at risk of accidents.

The spill has caused ongoing disruptions to the port’s operations, with several ships, including six oil tankers carrying a total of around twelve million barrels of oil, having been diverted to other ports both in China and other countries.

Submitted by: Jed Baguio

If you want to study ancient culture, food, and people go and visit India where prices of goods come out cheap and a luxurious stay wont really cost a leg.

India has a lot of history and knowledge to offer with seemingly glorious world-class artifacts and goodies for you to take back home. You only need enough money to support your needs on a trip to India and a luxurious stay in a first class hotel to enjoy the sights, scents and scenery of dazzling India.

Thats why cheap airline tickets to India are a necessity in order to maximize your stay as part of your game plan to be able to have enough to spend on a luxurious hotel and eat ethnic food.

You also need to plan your trip early if you need to find those cheap airline tickets to India. Cheap airline tickets to India are commonly the first ones to go before anything else in your plan of action.

Many airline companies claim to offer cheap airline tickets to India, after all, it is their job to get customers. One way to attract customers like fleas is to make them think you have what they need. Considering that you are among the many people who are in need of cheap airline tickets to India, you should get the best source for finding them.

Searching online, through the internet is the best resource for information on cheap airline tickets to India. Many websites offer free information on cheap airline tickets to India.

Most of them say that cheap airline tickets to India come from Air India, Northwest, or Cathay pacific. But travel agents should not be relied on too much as they are all out to close the deal themselves regardless of your plight.

Travel agencies act as middlemen and they indeed might have access to cheap airline tickets to India, and they can afford to sell them cheaper than the reliable airline sites. India is also a country hyping up its tourism programs, as you can see by the increase of India advertisements.

You can then expect the country to try persuading companies to provide cheap airline tickets to India to increase the influx of tourists to India. With the numerous ads, it would be more disadvantageous in finding cheap airline tickets to India since more people are showing their interest in this land of Yoga, Buddhism and most importantly, curry.

Getting cheap airline tickets to India will not be easy but it is possible. But bear in mind that cheap airline tickets to India often have certain consequences attached to them.

They range from crappy seats, low-class airplane food, and numerous other complaints. But if you chose wisely, cheap airline tickets to India need not be cheap but inexpensive.

It does require patience if you hang out at the ticket counter long enough, and wait for a person who might cancel a scheduled flight, and you can get your cheap airline tickets to India. But you could also wait for ages before anyone comes in to cancel.

If you want to find your cheap airline tickets to India, go and look for them. If you dont go look for cheap airline tickets to India, chances are, you will never find them.

Dont expect for cheap airline tickets to India to just fall into your lap. If youre a really good Yoga practitioner, an organization could offer to sponsor you so you may get really cheap airline tickets to India, one that is offered to you for free.

But that kind of thing also requires a lot of hard work. Freebies dont come often to common people; thus cheap airline tickets to India require the kind of hard work and dedication.

About the Author: If you liked this article, you might also like my other must-read guide to getting cheap airline tickets. click here:

Airline-Ticket-Guide.useful-tips.com/

Article Written By: Jed Baguio

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